Strathclyde (Grain whisky) / Kinclaith (single malt)

   

Kinclaith was a single malt produced in the Strathclyde distillery in Glasgow. Kinclaith was setup in 1957 but continued production for less than 20 years as it was closed in 1975, or the stills within the Strathclyde distillery used to produce the single malt were dismantled and removed.

Thanks to such a short production lifespan, Kinclaith whisky is extremely rare and when found, rather on the expensive side.

More great distillery info here thanks to Malt Madness

 
 

Distillery photo with kind permission by Teimei Horiuchi

 

 

 

Kinclaith

General whisky characteristics: Rich polished wood, nuts, aromatic

   
   

Signatory, Kinclaith, 35y, distilled 28th May 1969, 53.3% ABV

Cask No. 301444, one of 189 bottles

Typical cost of this bottle;

"Dram-atics" live review

 
 

Glass: Classic Malt

Colour: Rich oak / amber

Nose: Well polished old oak with a good hint of the (wax) polish itself. After some minutes a faint antiseptic quality emerges, also something a little oily, but not quite.

Palate: Lots of aged oak with that hint of rich polish. In fact the polish lingers into the finish. Also raisins and marzipan.

With 3 drops of water: The oak and polish become quite aromatic, turning almost into a nuttiness.

Finish: Long with dark fruits and a certain nuttiness.

Overall Impression: A rich and full-bodied whisky, but still quite hard to fully determine: Recently polished, aromatically floral sherry cask maybe? I need to revisit this one in a few days as thankfully I have an extra sample. The cost of a full (70cl) bottle of this has now reached crazy heights as it nears 800. Am I thankful for samples? You bet!

Revisiting this whisky two weeks later:

Glass: Classic Malt / Colour, Nose & Palate: as above

With 4 drops of water: The nuttiness is definitely in evidence, but there's also a richness which lends itself towards liquorice which leads into the finish.

With 4 more drops of water: A little more polish on the nose and also on the palate. This is far from unpleasant, but the over-riding elements here are aged oak and good old-fashioned wax furniture polish.

With a further 4 drops of water: Alongside the polish on the nose is a brand new car interior filled with luxurious leather. The palate is extremely smooth and now has more nuts and dark fruits (currants & raisins) to offer.

Finish: Long and intense on the roof of the mouth.

Overall Impression: Water definitely opens and improves this whisky, but take care not to add too much!

   

 

 

Strathclyde

Grain whisky

 
   

D. Taylor, Strathclyde, 37y, 11.1973 - 4.2011, 49.6% ABV

Cask No. 74065, Bottle No.37 of 101

Typical cost of this bottle;

 
 

Glass: Classic Malt

Colour: Vibrant gold

Nose: Sweet aromatic wood and butterscotch. In fact it's very aromatic and maybe including gentle hints of perfume. We're talking wonderful, I could nose this all evening!

Palate: Lots of wood, butterscotch and vanilla, with the vanilla expanding even more across the palate and then being joined by a warming suggestion of summer berries in creamy custard.

Finish: Medium and slightly under-fulfilled

Overall Impression: I'm a sucker for good old grains, I love this whisky and the only thing preventing ut from attaining "Greatness" on my scale is a slightly short finish which I felt could have had more presence, but maybe that's a nature of grain whisky? Anyway, it's brilliant and I wish I could have more.

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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